MOLLY MCGUIRE

Ben Meyers

With 

J. J. Jeshurun


MOLLY MCGUIRE

FADE IN:

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/COAL MINE/TOWN - DAY

The sudden clanging of a bell signals a mine accident. All action freezes and then proceeds in a frame by frame manner as black and white scenes of a miner's lift rising to the mine's entrance reveals several Pennsylvania coal miners supporting a badly injured Papa Malone. Children, sorting slate from coal, stop to watch as the coal miners load thirty-eight-year-old Papa Malone, both legs crushed, head badly damaged, into a Black Maria ambulance wagon. The conveyor belt continues to run in slow motion. As a pit boss yells, the slow motion returns to regular motion. The pit boss gestures fiercely at the children to attend to their work. Ten-year-old Cian ignores the pit boss, drops his coal bucket, and runs to town. Coal miner wife 2 notes Cian's run from the mine, leaves the town sidewalk to intercept Cian, grabs Cian by the shoulders, and questions Cian. Cian struggles to get free.

CIAN

Leave me ‘lone. I gotta tell Molly.

Cian breaks free from coal miner 2 wife’s grasp and continues to run through the town. The Black Maria wagon slowly wends through the streets of the coal mining town. Coal miners' wives stop along wooden sidewalks and fearfully whisper. Coal miner wife 1 quickly runs to coal miner wife 2 and coal miner wife 3.

COAL MINER WIFE 1

Whose is it?

COAL MINER WIFE 2

Molly’s.

Coal miner wife 1’s eyes show immediate relief before showing compassion.

COAL MINER WIFE 1

Bad?

COAL MINER WIFE 2

If ‘e lives, ‘e won’ work again.

COAL MINER WIFE 3

Makes Molly an orphan whether ‘e lives or dies.

Coal miner wife 2 grunts.

COAL MINER WIFE 2

Orphan or no orphan, she's got to eat, don' she? If she's got any stuffin' to 'er at all, she'll learn to work like a man.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/BACK STREETS/MOLLY'S HOUSE - DAY

Cian runs madly through the gray, drab alleys to Molly’s house, a bright, comfortable, two-bedroom house that sits at the edge of town. The house has a large chestnut tree inside its picket-fenced front yard. There are flowers in all the windows.

CIAN

M-O-L-L-Y! M-O-L-L-Y!

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/MOLLY'S HOUSE - DAY

Fifteen-year-old Molly hears the call, quickly dusts her hands from kneading bread, and runs into the yard and out the gate to meet Cian. 

Cian's arms gesture widely while talking to Molly. Molly clutches her heart with both hands and leaves the yard on a dead run toward the far side of town.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/CHESTNUT HILL OVERLOOKING 1900S CITY OF PHILADELPHIA - DAY

FLASH FORWARD FORTY YEARS

A fifty-five-year-old Molly (dressed in a modest white shirtwaist/black five gore skirt c. 1900) stands under a full-grown Chestnut tree, remembers, and muses.

MOLLY

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Life. Just about the time you think life loves you as much as you love it, it can take a sharp left turn and leave you sitting in a ditch-muddy all over-without a single clue as to why you aren't still riding high. You don't want to sit in the ditch too long though. Life's like a fast moving passenger train presenting windows of scenery no one should miss. You have to get back on life's train any way you can, hold on tight, and never let go-for the ride of your life.

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/MOLLY'S HOUSE - DAY

FLASH BACK FORTY YEARS

Fifteen-year-old Molly and Cian stand on the front porch as the Black Maria wagon stops. Coal Miner 1 and Coal Miner 2 pick Papa Malone from the floor of the wagon and lay him on Molly's front porch. Molly gestures to the men to carry Papa Malone into the house. Cian and Molly follow the men into the house.

CIAN

What’cha goin’ to do now, Molly?

MOLLY

I don’ know.

CIAN

I bet ya kin come work wi’ me.

MOLLY

Do you really think I could?

CIAN

Sure! I bet you could start tomorrow. See if it isn’t so.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/COAL MINE - DAY

Fifteen-year-old Molly (dressed in oversized, dirty, wrinkled men’s work clothes) sorts slate from coal. Molly works side by side Cian and other children. The end-of-day whistle blows. The pit box stops the coal conveyor belt. Cian and the other children scatter in various directions to go home. Molly reaches under the belt and retrieves a cracked cup filled with dirt. Cian turns at the top of the hill, stops, waves, and hollers.

CIAN

G’night, Molly.

Molly hollers and waves.

MOLLY

G’night.

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/MOLLY’S SHACK - DAY

Molly’s circumstances are severely changed. Molly enters a one-room, lean-to shack with a flowerless, treeless yard that is part of a back alley. As Molly enters the shack, the camera focuses on Papa Malone (both legs removed at the knee, stumps bandaged, head bandaged, mute) sitting on a tottery, three-legged stool and looking vacantly through the room’s single, dirty window. Molly sets the dirt-filled cup in the windowsill. 

MOLLY

You can't tell yet 'cause it's got a bit of work to do. But, jus' as soon as that chestnut seed cracks itself out of that hard shell and works its way up through all that dirt, you'll see we've got a winnin' specimen of a tree on our hands, Papa.

Molly kneels in front of Papa Malone.

MOLLY

Remember? We had a Chestnut tree in our front yard. You used to sing me a song about it every mornin’ b’fore you left for work.

Molly reaches to Papa Malone’s cheek and tilts his head gently.

MOLLY

(Speaks/sings “Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree”)

"Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree/When I held you on my knee/We were happy as can be/Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree/Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree/I'll kiss you and you'll kiss me/Oh, how happy we will be/Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree."

Molly stands and kisses the top of Papa Malone’s head; then, Molly bends to look him directly in the eyes.

MOLLY

Everythin’ gets well, in its own time. See if it isn’t so.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/CHESTNUT HILL OVERLOOKING 1900S PHILADELPHIA - DAY

A fifty-five-year-old Molly stands under the Chestnut tree, remembers, and muses.

MOLLY

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

It seems life loves to keep people running this-a-way and that-a-way. Always running for one thing or another. When Joe called, I came running.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/COAL MINE - DAY

FLASHBACK FORTY YEARS/SEVERAL MONTHS LATER

Fifteen-year-old Molly, dressed in men’s work clothes, looks up from emptying a coal pail onto a conveyor belt and sees Joe McGuire, black Irish, muscular, handsome, asking for a job from the coal boss. Joe McGuire notices Molly. Joe’s eyes flirtatiously make fun of her garb and position. Molly’s chin rises haughtily. Joe laughs and turns to accept a work ticket from the coal boss.

INT./EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/COMPANY STORE/SIDEWALKS - DAY

Molly, clean and dressed in woman’s attire, buys groceries in the company store. Through the store’s window, Molly sees Joe McGuire standing on the street flirting with coal miners’ daughters. Molly exits the store with an armful of groceries. Joe Mcguire’s eyes catch Molly’s exit. Joe McGuire excuses himself from the crowd of girls, falls into step with Molly, and removes the groceries from her arms over her protest.

JOE MCGUIRE

You look a little different with women’s clothes on.

Molly raises her chin haughtily.

JOE MCGUIRE

But, a little cleanin’ up didn’ change your spirit none.

Molly stops and reaches for the bags.

MOLLY

I turn off here.

Joe McGuire looks over Molly’s head through the alley.

JOE MCGUIRE

If I’m goin’ to be courtin’ you, I guess I’d better know where you live.

MOLLY

Courtin’ me!

JOE MCGUIRE

You might as well lead the way. I’m meetin’ your folks today.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/CHESTNUT HILL OVERLOOKING 1900S PHILADELPHIA - DAY

FLASH FORWARD FORTY YEARS

A fifty-five-year-old Molly stands under the Chestnut tree, remembers, and muses.

MOLLY

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

And I was glad to come running. Joe was big and strong and tall and safe. It wasn't long before it was all legal and I wrapped my legs around him, strained and panted while he sweated. Three children came just as rapidly as you could say one, two, three. One died and I was left with two. When my dad moved in, Joe didn't mind. He was big enough and strong enough for all of us.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/JOE AND MOLLY'S THREE-ROOM HOUSE - DAY

FLASHBACK THIRTY-SEVEN YEARS

Eighteen-year-old Molly wears a bright, clean dress while cooking a meal; Papa Malone sits in a comfortable rocker by a clean, curtained window and gazes steadily at a 12-foot Chestnut tree in the front yard while holding Molly's infant son, Seanán. Molly's older son, Donnegán, sits on the floor playing with a sheepskin ball filled with straw. Joe McGuire comes through the door, covered with coal dust, tosses hat to hat hook, and swings Molly into the air. Molly protests laughingly and brushes her dress after Joe sets her feet back on the floor. Joe McGuire sniffs appreciatively at the meat pie sitting on the side stove and goes to wash. The McGuire family sits to meal.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/CHESTNUT HILL OVERLOOKING 1900S CITY OF PHILADELPHIA - DAY

FLASH FORWARD THIRTY-SEVEN YEARS

A fifty-five-year-old Molly stands under the Chestnut tree, remembers, and muses.

MOLLY

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Sometimes I looked at my father and a shadow would cross my mind, a little flitter of worry. I guess worry came because sometimes it seemed I was looking into the future and it was Joe sitting there with no breath and no legs, used up by forty.

FLASH BACK THIRTY-FIVE YEARS

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/PASTURE - DAY

Joe McGuire and young men tussle with a leather ball. Joe McGuire successfully wrestles the ball away from the young men and wins the game. Coal miners’ families watch along the edge of the pasture field. Molly and her two sons, Donnegán and Seanán, ages two and five, sit under a Chestnut tree watching.

MOLLY (V.O.)

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

But Joe had the life running through him and every time I saw him I didn’t worry about forty anymore. All that mattered was the way his eyes called and the way I just naturally answered with full life and youth coursing through my veins, an equal match to his every time.

Joe McGuire runs to the side of the field where Molly stands waiting with Donnegán and Seanán, lifts Molly into the air, laughs with strength and health, sets Molly on the ground, reaches up, breaks a flowering branch from a Chestnut tree, and presents the branch to Molly.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Speaks “Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree”)

An', for Mrs. Molly McGuire, "Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree/When I held you on my knee/We were happy as can be/Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree/Under the spreading Chestnut tree/I'll kiss you and you'll kiss me/Oh, how happy we will be/Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree."

Molly blushes, accepts the tribute confidently, and tucks her arm into Joe’s arm. Donnegán takes Joe's hand; Seanán takes Molly's hand. The family moves away from the pasture toward the streets of coal mining town 1.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/STREETS - DAY

Joe McGuire and his family move through the town’s streets toward home.

MOLLY (V.O.)

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

I could see how even the rich girls were made just a bit uncomfortable around him and I exulted because he was mine and I was sure.

Big bosses' daughters, Jill Marshone, boss daughter 1, and boss daughter 2, dressed in finery, come sweeping out of the millinery shop. Joe McGuire releases Donnegán’s hand and tips his hat. Jill Marshone, boss daughter 1, and boss daughter 2 visibly blush. Molly notes and takes pride in the effect.

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/JOE AND MOLLY'S THREE-ROOM HOUSE - DAY

Coal mine workers line to accept their pay stubs in town. Inside her home, Molly hurriedly pulls her apron from her dress, curls her hair, pats perfume behind her ears, cleans her two children's faces, pulls two pies from the oven to set on the windowsill, and sets a fresh bouquet of flowers on the dining table.

MOLLY (V.O.)

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

And Joe worked and brought home the money. And I looked at the way the rich girls did and I took my hands and worked to make our life as much like theirs as I could. We had flowers at the door and fresh pies at night. My babies were clean and I learned to sweep my hair into stylish curls and to wear dresses that showed just a bit of the ankle when lifted just so. I shopped where they shopped. And Joe would tell me how pretty I was and how I could outshine them all and I believed him. It seemed they had such a dull life and we had so much. And the babies grew.

Joe McGuire comes sweeping through the door and deposits the money on the kitchen table. Molly’s eyes alight; Molly counts the money, gasps, prudently removes part of money, puts it in a kitchen jar, and carefully divides the rest into small envelopes.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/MILLINER’S SHOP - DAY

Molly stands in the milliner's shop quietly fingering hats while watching Jill Marshone, boss daughter 1, and boss daughter 2 choose hats for a social event. As Jill Marshone, boss daughter 1, and boss daughter 2 leave the store, Molly notices how they lift their silk parasols before crossing the street. Molly fingers an inexpensive parasol and purchases it.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/JOE AND MOLLY'S THREE-ROOM HOUSE - DAY/NIGHT

Molly pours diligent attention over a ladies' clothing catalog, tears a bustle from one of her dresses, shortens the front of the skirt, and remakes it into the newly fashionable 'slim silhouette' profiles. Joe McGuire returns from work. Molly models the new dress with the new parasol over her shoulder. Joe McGuire openly admires her, picks her up, carries her to the bedroom, and kicks the door shut with his foot.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/MILLINER SHOP - DAY

SEVERAL MONTHS LATER

Jill Marshone lifts a new parasol from the milliner shop's display, fingers it, reluctantly returns it to the display table, and leaves the shop. Molly observes this instance and contemplates the meaning of the action.

MOLLY (V.O.)

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

But, life cycles round, and one day I saw Jill Marshone, the big boss's daughter, put a new French parasol back on its shelf and leave the milliners without it. I saw the look on her face. She wanted it; but, she didn't buy it. I wondered. Jill dressed prettier than any of the other girls in town.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/MILLINER SHOP WINDOW - DAY

SEVERAL WEEKS LATER

Molly watches through the milliner shop window as Jill Marshone, boss daughter 1, and boss daughter 2 board the train's club car while porters load innumerable trunks of their luggage onto the train.

MOLLY (V.O.)

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Several weeks later I saw the bosses' daughters and wives board the train's club cars. Only the bosses stayed. I was the only person frequenting the milliner's shop and I wondered.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/COMPANY STORE - DAY

Molly visits with an excited Coal miner wife 1 and Coal miner wife 2 outside the company store.

MOLLY (V.O.)

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Then I heard about a fracas down at work and Joe didn’t come home until late.

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/JOE AND MOLLY’S HOUSE/BACKYARD PICKET FENCE - DAY/NIGHT

Molly talks with an obviously upset and worried Mrs. McQuery across the picket fence.

MOLLY (V.O.)

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Mrs. McQuery said the paychecks had been cut twenty percent and that some of the men wouldn't be working anymore. That same little flutter passed through my stomach that I got sometimes when I looked at my father in his chair, but I knew it would be the old men like Mrs. McQuery's husband, who didn't have the lungs anymore, who wouldn't be working. It wouldn't be my Joe. It would never be my Joe because he had the life coursing through his veins, like a life eternal.

Molly eats supper alone with Papa Malone, Donnegán, and Seanán; Molly puts Papa Malone, Donnagán, and Seanán, ages six and three, to bed. Molly stands at the bedroom window and looks for Joe. Finally, Molly crawls into bed and sleeps.

MOLLY (V.O.)

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

But Joe didn’t come home the next night and the night after that and Mrs. McQuery said there was going to be a fight.

TWO NIGHTS LATER

Molly sits at the edge of the bed, uneasy.

FLASHBACK

Molly remembers Jill Marshone’s hand replacing the parasol on the milliner shop's shelf.

FLASH FORWARD

MOLLY (V.O.)

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

I remembered Jill Marshone putting the silk parasol back on the milliner's table and I remembered all the bosses' daughters and wives boarding the train and I ran to find Joe.

Molly suddenly rises, hurriedly pulls on her clothes, runs out the door.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/STREETS - NIGHT

Molly runs through the streets of the coal town, and searches for lighted windows. Molly cannot find Joe and returns home in the early morning hours. 

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/JOE AND MOLLY’S HOUSE - DAY

THREE DAYS LATER

The sounds of a mob fighting and then a gunshot fill the air; Molly runs outside into the front yard of her house. Mrs. McQuery comes running down the hill to Molly’s front gate; Joe McGuire comes from the side of the house into the front yard of her house. Joe’s face is bleeding; his clothes are torn.

MOLLY (V.O.)

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

There was another fracas on Saturday when the men were lined to take their pay except this time it got a little out of hand. Mrs. McQuery came running to tell me that Jill Marshone's father had been killed and Joe came home and said there would be trouble and we had to move.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/PENNSYLVANIA WOODS/SECLUDED GROVE - NIGHT/DAY

Molly, stressed and afraid, quietly loads Papa Malone, Donnegán, and Seanán onto a wagon seat. The wagon contains all their household possessions. Molly leaves by a side road from town, drives the rest of the day through the woods, and sets up camp in a secluded grove.

MOLLY (V.O.)

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

We moved three times after that.

Molly ladles Irish stew into a dish and hands the stew to Papa Malone.

MOLLY

Irish manna, Papa. Eat up. It will make you strong.

Papa Malone nods and takes stew from Molly. Molly feeds Donnegán and Seanán.

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 2/ALLEY SHACK - DAY/NIGHT

ONE MONTH LATER

Molly drives the wagon into coal mine town 2, inquires for house directions, pulls up to the front door of a one-room alley shack, unloads wagon, and sets up house. Rain floods the yard in front of the alley shack. Joe McGuire slogs through the muck, enters the house, and hands Molly the week's pay. Molly immediately sets stew and bread on the table.

MOLLY

Irish manna, Joe. Eat up. It will make you strong.

Joe McGuire grimaces and silently eats the meal, pushes back his plate, and immediately falls asleep with his head on the table. Papa Malone, Donnegán, and Seanán are already asleep in the corner of the room. Molly takes Joe McGuire to a corner bed, undresses him, and covers him. Before light, Joe McGuire awakes, dresses, refuses Molly's offer for breakfast with a grim shake of his head, grabs a loaf of bread, stuffs it into his coat, and leaves the alley shack. Molly sits at the table holding the week's pay and carefully parcels it between envelopes. Half of the envelopes are left empty; no pay is left to stuff into the kitchen jar. Molly holds her head in her hands.

MOLLY V.O.

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Life sometimes pours ice-cold rain to drive you to places maybe you wouldn’t normally go. You’ve got to be comfortable with the driving and keep your eyes wide open because life will give you what you can accept.

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 2/ALLEY SHACK/CHURCH/WOODS - DAY/NIGHT

ONE DAY LATER - SUNDAY

Molly dresses, walks alone to a church on a hill, quietly takes her place in a back pew, looks up at the bosses’ families sitting in the balconies, stays after the services to help in a community project, works close to the table where the bosses' families work, listens carefully to their conversations, and notes the university man, a beau of one of the bosses' daughters. The bosses' family chatter is exceptionally happy and carefree. Boss daughter Anna addresses the university man.

BOSS DAUGHTER ANNA

(Teasing)

I suppose all that scientific learning has quite dulled your senses to the more pleasant aspects of life.

The university man blushes around his ears.

UNIVERSITY MAN

Not at all. I didn’t come this far just for the study opportunity.

BOSS WIFE

(Laughing)

Of course, Anna’s marble cakes, king’s cakes, and Neapolitan ice creams have nothing to do with it, I suppose.

The university man looks surprised.

UNIVERSITY MAN

Anna’s? Truly, I though your cook was quite responsible for those delicacies.

BOSS DAUGHTER ANNA

(Smiling)

She is. Mother is just trying to fool you into thinking I have talent which I do not.

The Boss Father, irritated, shifts in his seat.

BOSS FATHER

They’ll keep you tied in nonsensical conversation all day, if you let them. Let’s talk about the new chemistry processes you mentioned. What will that mean for the coal industry?

Molly quietly rises from her working table, walks toward home, and talks to self while walking through the woods.

MOLLY

(speaks/sings “Cake and Tea”)

“They talk so easily, so lightly, so happily/They wear their clothes so elegantly, cut their cake so precisely/What difference do I see?/So that they have three kinds of cake to dip into their tea?/Are their daughters prettier?/Are they more righteous, more devout?/Do they feel more than me?/Need more than me?/Does silver prefer their company to mine?/Where is my error so that I cannot have things so fine?/Why doesn't some of that cake and tea, come to me?”

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 2/ALLEY SHACK - NIGHT

SIX DAYS LATER - SATURDAY

Joe McGuire opens the door, enters the alley shack, and hands Molly his week's pay. Joe McGuire reaches for the kitchen jar where Molly keeps her money. It's empty. Molly immediately sets stew and bread on the table. Joe looks at the food.

JOE MCGUIRE

A new mine opened a little south of here.

Molly looks at Joe and nods her head ‘yes’.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 3/SMALL GLADE - DAY/NIGHT

Joe McGuire, Molly, Donnegán, and Seanán sit on the wagon seat. Papa Malone sits on top of the load of household possessions. Joe McGuire drives into a small glade at the edge of coal mine town 3, dismounts the wagon, unhitches the horses, nods to Molly, and walks toward the town. Molly begins setting up camp, starts the fire, and sets the potatoes and onions to boil. Joe McGuire returns after dark. Molly looks at him. He shakes his head 'no'.

NEXT DAY

Joe McGuire mounts a wagon horse before dawn and leaves Molly, Papa Malone, Donnegán, and Seanán in the small glade with the wagon and one horse. Molly, dressed in a long flannel nightgown, stands by the wagon and watches Joe leave.

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 3/CHURCH/ROAD - DAY

SUNDAY

Molly attends a small church on the far side of coal mine town 3. Molly watches the bosses’ families sitting in the front pews, carefully compares them to the rest of the congregation, and notes the minister’s ease of manner with the bosses' families as if able to talk with them on a different level than with the rest of the congregation. Molly puzzles over this instance. Molly quietly leaves the church without talking with anyone and walks slowly toward their camp along a dusty road.

MOLLY

(Speaks “Differences”)

“We're people, the same, ain't we?/I live, breathe, bleed, the same, don't I?/The Man taught 'no favors'/There should be no favors/And yet, it's like I'm looking from the outside in/Why is this so?/I wear clothes clean, the same as them/I read and write, don't I?/But I see he prefers their company/Smiles easily, almost relieved/He's kind with all the others/But, he belongs to the 'Families'.”

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 3/SMALL GLADE - DAY

TWO MONTHS LATER

Molly happily reads a note from Joe McGuire to Papa Malone, Donnegán, and Seanán.

MOLLY

‘E’s got a house for us and ‘e’s sent money for a horse for the wagon.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/THREE-ROOM SHACK - NIGHT

Under a clear sky and full moon, Molly pulls the wagon to the front of a dark, three-room shack. Molly unloads Papa Malone while Donnegán and Seanán bail out of the wagon and run ahead.

MOLLY

Oh, Papa! It's got a Chestnut tree just the size ours would have been and, the house, it's comfortably sized. I'll put flowers along the walk there and grow a garden over there.

Donnegán and Seanán run excitedly into the three-room shack. Papa Malone waits for Molly to light a lantern and to carry a bag of camping gear into the main room. Inside, Molly stops and drops the bag of gear to the floor.

MOLLY

Papa! Did you ever!

Molly sets the lantern on a large oak kitchen table, walks to a large cook stove, runs hands over its ample surface, turns around, and sees a rocking chair in the corner by the window. Molly's eyes fill with tears.

MOLLY

Oh, Joe.

Molly starts a fire, urges the boys to unload their bedding from the wagon, and sets a pail of yesterday's stew to warm on the stove. Joe McGuire walks into the room, throws his hat on the hat hook, swings Molly into the air, tosses and catches his sons in the air, shakes Papa Malone’s hand, washes, and changes his clothes. The McGuire family sits at table and eats.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/THREE-ROOM SHACK - DAY

THREE MONTHS LATER

Flowers bloom along the sandy path leading to the house; the house door and window frames are painted white; the windows are open; new curtains flutter in a breeze; the newly painted black and red wagon sits to the side of the house; two tethered and groomed horses graze at the side of the house; a garden grows; Donnegán and Seanán, dressed for church, leave the house to hitch the horses to the wagon.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/THREE-ROOM SHACK - DAY

Molly, dressed in a stylish, slim silhouette-style dress, fixes Joe’s cravat.

MOLLY

It’s a fitted suit, Joe. It’s the newest thing. You’ll see. All the bosses are wearin’ ‘em now.

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/CHURCH YARD/CHURCH/ROAD - DAY

Joe McGuire pulls the wagon into a churchyard in a small village outside the coal mining area in a location where the bosses' families live rather than the coal miners. Molly waves familiarly with everyone; Molly calls hello to the bosses' daughters. Amelia Reed, a boss daughter, waves prettily in return. Joe, Molly, Papa Malone, Donnegán, and Seanán enter the church and sit in a back pew. Molly pays close attention to the bosses, their wives, their daughters, and their children throughout the sermon. Molly compares their decorum to her family's manners and admires her sons' good behavior. The McGuire family joins the afternoon church picnic. Joe talks with the bosses. Molly talks with the bosses' daughters and meets the beaus of the bosses' daughters. In the late afternoon the McGuire family heads home in the wagon. Joe hands Molly a small package.

MOLLY

What is it?

JOE MCGUIRE

Open it and see.

Molly tears the wrapping off the package and turns the gadget around in her hands.

MOLLY

I still don' know what it is.

JOE MCGUIRE

The latest thing-a can opener.

MOLLY

I can’t tell how it would possibly work.

JOE MCGUIRE

I’ll show you when we get home.

MOLLY

I’ve got somethin’ new to show you, too.

Molly reaches behind her and pulls a jar of root beer from the picnic basket.

MOLLY

Amelia Reed gave it to me. Everyone’s drinkin’ it.

Joe McGuire takes a sip and passes it back to Papa Malone, Donnegán, and Seanán.

DONNEGÁN

What is it?

MOLLY

The latest thing-root beer.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/THREE-ROOM SHACK - NIGHT

MONTHS LATER

Molly sets the table; the food is ready to serve; Joe McGuire is late; Molly moves to the window to look for him. Molly pulls a Washington Pie from the side cupboard and cuts pieces for dessert. Finally, Molly serves Papa Malone, Donnegán, and Seanán a rich dinner; reads a Hans Christian Andersen story while they eat; and tucks Donnegán and Seanán into bed. Near midnight, Joe comes through the door, nods to Molly, avoids her eyes, and sits to eat.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/COMPANY STORE - DAY

ONE WEEK LATER

Molly buys groceries at the company store, fingers beautiful fabric for a new dress, requests ten yards, and engages in conversation with the store keeper’s wife.

MOLLY

Joe’s been home late every night this week. You’d think we were going to war again and the country needed more coal. 

STORE KEEPER’S WIFE

He didn’t tell you?

MOLLY

Tell me what?

STORE KEEPER’S WIFE 

They cut wages twenty per cent, honey, announced it on Monday.

MOLLY

No. He didn’ tell me.

Molly looks down at her purchases.

MOLLY

Guess I won’ be needin’ these after all.

Molly removes the fabric and the bananas from her purchases and returns the items to the store keeper’s wife.

MOLLY

So, some of the men are workin’ double shifts to make up the difference in wages?

STORE KEEPER’S WIFE

Only the lucky ones.

INT./EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/THREE-ROOM SHACK/CHURCH - NIGHT/DAY

Joe McGuire comes home exhausted, hands Molly the pay tickets, pushes back his plate before he's finished eating, and refuses dessert.

NEXT DAY - SUNDAY

Joe McGuire refuses to go to church. Molly loads Donnegán, Seanán, and Papa Malone into the wagon to drive them to church. The front pews of the church, the bosses' family seats, are empty. After services, the Reverend approaches Molly with a small, wrapped package in his hand.

REVEREND

Molly, Amelia Reed gave this to me for you. She said to remind you to read the happy verses and make them your own.

Molly unwraps the package. It's a Bible.

MOLLY

Why didn’ she wait to give it to me ‘erself?

The Reverend uncomfortably looks down.

MOLLY

She isn’ comin’ back, is she.

The Reverend shakes his head 'no'.

MOLLY

They’re all gone. An’ we’re left.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/THREE-ROOM SHACK - DAY

Molly, Papa Malone, Donnegán, and Seanán enter the room. Joe McGuire is drinking and drunk.

MOLLY

Joe, it would have been better for you to have gone to church.

JOE MCGUIRE

Who was there that you’d want me to talk to?

Donnegán points to the whiskey bottle.

DONNEGÁN

Is it root beer?

JOE MCGUIRE

Not the kind you’d like.

Donnegán and Seanán run outside to play. Papa Malone retires to the porch to nap.

MOLLY

You should have told me they cut the wages, Joe.

JOE MCGUIRE

Thought your ‘friends’ would tell you.

MOLLY

None of the bosses’ families were in church today to tell me.

JOE MCGUIRE

They knew long before now. They had plenty of opportunity to tell you.

Molly remains quiet. Molly remembers the procession of events at coal mining town 1.

FLASHBACK

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/MILLINER'S SHOP WINDOW - DAY

Bosses daughters and wives leave coal mining town 1 by railway club car. Jill Marshone looks back before boarding the train.

FLASH FORWARD

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/THREE-ROOM SHACK - DAY

MOLLY

We’ll cut back, Joe, so you don’ have to work so hard.

JOE MCGUIRE

The rumor is they’re going to cut wages again.

MOLLY

Oh, Joe.

Molly thinks a bit.

MOLLY

We won’ go hungry. I grew a good garden this summer.

Joe empties the whiskey bottle and pushes away from the table.

JOE MCGUIRE

I’m goin’ out. I won’ be back ‘til late.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/THREE-ROOM SHACK - NIGHT

Molly sits in the bed looking at the moon through the window, waits for Joe, picks up the Bible, begins reading, stops, and lifts her face to the window to speak/sing.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “I Been Here Before”)

“I been here before/Not a good place to be/So, is this to be my life?/Now to eternity?/Why do we have to do it again?/A little circle worn/A little path forlorn/I been here before/Not a good place to be/A path going nowhere/A life unborn."

Molly’s face twists in fear.

MOLLY

(Whispers)

We were lucky las’ time, Joe. We’re pushin’ luck to play this game twice.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/HOME-STYLE PUB - NIGHT

At the end of a smoke-filled room full of coal miners, Joe McGuire sits and listens intently.

MCGINTY

An’ what’s next? Eatin’ our babies?

MCCALLAUGH

Most of us been through this b’fore-jus’ like in the old country.

CORCORAN

We’re all men together now, aren’t we? It’s time to make it fair for everyone.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/THREE-ROOM SHACK - NIGHT/DAY

Joe McGuire comes home drunk. Molly helps him to bed, stays up, and reads the Bible.

NEXT DAY - SUNDAY

Molly lies beside Joe, looks out the window on a summery Sunday morning, listens to the birds singing, and rises to sit on the side of the bed beside Joe. Joe awakes.

JOE MCGUIRE

Aren’t you supposed to be in church?

MOLLY

Thought we could take a picnic down by the creek...jus' you and me.

Joe nods and rolls over.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/GRASSY STREAM BANK - DAY

Molly and Joe sit on a blanket under a Chestnut tree. Molly pulls petals from a Chestnut tree frond.

MOLLY

Remember that first town where we met and started our family?

JOE MCGUIRE

Long time ago.

MOLLY

I mean before all the trouble started.

Joe nods head 'yes'.

MOLLY

The bosses’ families left jus' like this time. Before they left, I remember Jill Marshone pickin' up a new parasol in the milliner's shop and puttin' it back. She couldn' buy it, Joe. It was jus' before they cut all the men's wages. It was like the bosses' families took a cut before we took a cut.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Bitterly)

An’ while they pass up silk parasols, we pass up fresh eggs and meat.

MOLLY

Then we need to move to a place in life where a wage cut just means a silk parasol can't be bought.

JOE MCGUIRE

We’ve moved three times and we're right back where we started.

MOLLY

I was talkin' about changin' our place in life, Joe.

JOE MCGUIRE

What are you talkin’ about?

MOLLY

I’ve been spendin’ time with the bosses' families for ever so long, tryin' to figure out what the difference is, why it's jus' the loss of a silk parasol for 'em and food for us. I couldn't see the difference for a long time. My man's more of a man than theirs and my sons're more abler than their sons. I puzzled on it for a good, long time, Joe.

JOE MCGUIRE

An’?

MOLLY

Beside them havin' more than us, I could only find one difference.

Joe McGuire waits.

MOLLY

It was the day the Reverend came down and talked with the bosses’ families. I saw he was at ease with 'em, like he belonged to 'em more than to the rest of us.

JOE MCGUIRE

You’ve always been funny-like, Molly. It was probably nothin' at all.

Molly shakes her head firmly.

MOLLY

No, Joe. I felt this and saw it. Did you know their Reverends have university educations? They're not 'called' like we're used to, natural-like. They plan and educate for it. The bosses' daughters marry university men for the mos' part.

JOE MCGUIRE

What are you suggestin'?

Molly takes a deep breath and pulls a paper from her pocket.

MOLLY

This is the kind of money a university man makes in a year.

Joe McGuire looks; his face falls.

MOLLY

It’s why a downturn only means a little to 'em.

JOE MCGUIRE

I can’t go to university, Molly.

MOLLY

We could pare down, live poor and quiet, while you're goin'.

JOE MCGUIRE

We jus’ been cut twenty percent and now a second cut. How can we pare down any more than that?

Molly points across the railroad tracks to a small shack hidden in the woods.

MOLLY

You’re not thinkin' about it rightly...look across the tracks there...that's the widow Bremerly livin' there. She's got three kids and no husband. She's makin' it somehow...maybe not so fine clothes and maybe not so fine neighborhood, but she's makin' it. We jus' got to act like the widow Bremerly for a little while, Joe, while you work to change our place in life. Jus' for a little while.

JOE MCGUIRE

You’re askin' me to keep you poor, Molly.

MOLLY

Looks to me like you got the choice of keepin' us poor for a lifetime or for a few years while you go to school.

JOE MCGUIRE

I don't know anythin' about that other life.

MOLLY

You fit in well with the bosses' families. I watched you. My wage'll give you room and board. The boys' wages will give you books and schoolin'. All you have to do is study.

JOE MCGUIRE

Your wage!

MOLLY

I got a job at the glass factory in Philadelphia, if I want it, and they can use Donnagán and Seanán, too. Amelia Reed told me about the university there. She said a person can start a new life with jus' two years' university work.

Joe McGuire is quiet. Molly reaches into her pocket again to retrieve a letter.

MOLLY

All you got to look forward to here is hangin'. The boys and I would be left supportin' ourselves with no way out of the mines. If you go to school, we'd be workin' with hope, knowin' that everything's goin' to be wonderful when you graduate from university.

JOE MCGUIRE

You’re wantin’ a university man, Molly?

MOLLY

All I ever wanted was Joe, but my Joe’s got no place to go.

JOE MCGUIRE

Would you like runnin' with the bosses' families for real, Molly?

MOLLY

I liked their women folk.

Joe gets up from the picnic blanket, helps Molly to her feet, breaks a frond from the Chestnut tree, and tips her chin.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Speaks “Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree”)

“Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree/When I held you on my knee/We were happy as can be/Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree/Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree/I'll kiss you and you'll kiss me/Oh, how happy we will be/Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree."

Molly’s face shines. Molly wraps her arms around Joe’s neck. Later, Joe loads the picnic into the wagon and rounds the hobbled horses. Joe swings Molly onto the wagon seat.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “Everyone’s Gotta Begin Somewhere”)

“Everyone’s gotta begin somewhere/Do somethin' different, make a small turn/Pay a small price/Make a little war/Fight for a better place in life/If you strength'n your muscles/They'll only pay so much/If you strength'n your mind/You'll get twice as much/Adam and Eve's decree/You'll work once for the tree/Work twice, have a life/Two are better than one/It's what the wise king said/A woman can be a man, can't she?/I'll be a man to make everythin' right/It'll be nothin', you'll see/Everyone's gotta begin somewhere/Do somethin' different, make a small turn/Pay a small price/Make a little war/Fight for a better place in life."

INT./EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 4/THREE-ROOM SHACK - NIGHT

TWO NIGHTS LATER

Joe comes home late, face grim and set.

JOE MCGUIRE

I’m deep in, Molly.

MOLLY

Are your hands still clean?

Joe looks down at his hands, looks at Molly.

JOE MCGUIRE

Not for long.

MOLLY

Then the decision's been made for us.

Joe and Molly load the wagon and the family during the night and turn south to Philadelphia under a new moon.

MOLLY

(Speaks “Gold and Silver”)

“Gold and silver grow on a strange vine/Seated deep in the ground of the mind/Knowledge makes the soil rich and fine/Allows the vine to unfurl and unwind/Man packs empty pockets full and fine with the knowledge from that vine/I watched him/I watched her/They planted their vines in enriched soil from knowledge-filled minds/Packed pockets full and fine with the knowledge from that vine."

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA NEIGHBORHOODS/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBORHOOD/SHACK - DAY

SEVERAL WEEKS LATER

Joe pulls the wagon into the better Philadelphia neighborhoods. Molly shakes her head 'no' at each house Joe shows her. Finally, Joe pulls into an immigrant neighborhood. The house for let is cramped, small, dirty-worse than the second house in the coal mining camps. Joe looks at it grimly. Molly sets her lips firmly, shakes her head 'yes'. Joe, Molly, Donnegán, and Seanán unload the wagon and take Papa Malone inside and set him by the shack's single, dirty window.

MOLLY

Papa, keep lookin' at where we're goin', not where we're at.

Molly takes a cup filled with dirt from inside a used flour sack wrapping and sets it in the window.

MOLLY

Seems we're always plantin' new chestnut seeds, Papa. See that hill way over there above the chimney tops? When this tree gets big enough, I'm going to plant it for you on that hill.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/GLASS FACTORY - DAY

Molly, Donnegán, and Seanán present a letter to the glass factory boss. The glass factory boss looks carefully at Molly, Donnagán, and Seanán.

GLASS FACTORY BOSS

Not exactly what I expected. They’re a bit small and frankly, you don't look strong enough to do the job.

MOLLY

My boys are wiry and strong and I can work day and night without stop. I was trained in the coal mines. You'll be congratulatin' yourself on a good hire, you'll see.

The glass factory boss hesitates, then shrugs his shoulders, nods, and directs them to work.

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/GROUNDS/ADMISSION OFFICE - DAY

Joe-dressed in a suit-walks onto the University of Pennsylvania campus; observes buildings with pillars, stone walks, and large trees; enters admissions office; begins application process; and sits in front of an admissions officer.

ADMISSIONS OFFICER

I would like to admit you, Mr. McGuire, but we have requirements to meet-Latin, Greek, and Mathematics.

JOE MCGUIRE

I figured in the mines and I worked with men from all over the world. I've an aptitude for languages.

ADMISSIONS OFFICER

We usually try to keep a certain standard.

JOE MCGUIRE

I’m willin' to risk my money that I'll make it.

Admissions officer hesitates, plays with the edge of the admissions paper, and decides.

ADMISSIONS OFFICER

All right. Sign here. Welcome to the university, Mr. McGuire.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBORHOOD/SHACK - NIGHT

Molly cooks stew on the stove. Joe walks into the room and hands Molly the university acceptance letter. Molly beams, reaches deep into her apron pocket, and hands Joe the tuition money.

MOLLY

They pay us by the day, Joe. Donnagán and Seanán, show him what you've got.

Donnegán and Seanán proudly hand Joe the book money. Joe hugs both boys. Molly does a quick Irish jig.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “We’re On Our Way”)

“We’re on our way/At last/It's almost in our hands/We're workin' for a promised land/A brand new day comin' our way/We'll be walkin' on the avenues/McGuire's tree's greenin' from every tip and bough/Our ship's sailin' with a strong new mast/Storms dispersin', fair weather's forecast/We're on our way/At last/It's almost in our hands/We're working for a promised land/A brand new day comin' our way/We'll be walkin' on the avenues/McGuire's tree's greenin' from every tip and bough/Our ship's sailin' with a strong new mast/Storms dispersin', fair weather's forecast."

Molly races to Papa Malone’s side and kisses the top of his head; then, she turns to lavish kisses and hugs on her children. Lastly, she turns to Joe and kisses him gently on the lips and cradles his face in his hands.

MOLLY

Oh, Joe. God bless and prosper all our efforts.

INT./EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/CLASSROOM - DAY

MONTH LATER

Joe reads a Latin book, takes test, fails test, and receives a warning notice. Joe reads a mathematics book, takes test, fails test, and receives a warning notice. Joe reads a philosophy book, takes test, fails test, and receives a warning notice. Joe gets up from the last test, grips the warning notices in his hands, walks outside the classroom, and shakes a fist to heaven. Joe begins pacing back and forth on a neatly kempt sidewalk.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Speak/sings “Ain’t I A Man?”)

“What’s the matter with me?/Ain't I a man?/I'm every bit as good as they/They cut me and sting me in every way/I can read, but it's like I can't read/The words are all new/They must speak of things wise and true/I've no means to take it in/Like a block of stone/Not fit for use or beauty/I'm every bit as good as they/Ain't I a man?"

Joe looks at the pillared buildings and immaculate landscaping so different from the shack in which his family lives.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Continues to speak/sing “Ain’t I A Man?”)

“They value something different here/It's a different kind of man/What is a man?/I had a dream/I used to know/I had a plan."

Joe looks with deep anguish at the sky.

JOE MCGUIRE

Didn’t I have a plan?

INT.PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBORHOOD/SHACK - NIGHT

Joe talks with Molly.

JOE MCGUIRE

It’s no different here than anywhere-they're like bosses keepin' the workin' man down.

Molly looks at the failed exams and warning notices.

MOLLY

But, God doesn’t keep a good man down, Joe.

Molly looks at the papers, wrinkles forehead, and concentrates.

MOLLY

There’s somethin' I almost know if I could but call it to mind.

Molly cocks her head a bit and then smiles.

MOLLY

I see it. It's as clear as day. It's a kind of discipline, a honin' of the rough edges. It's not easy bein' refashioned into a new kind of man. They all went through it-every one of them. When you succeed, it will be easier for your sons. You've exercised a different set of muscles all your life. It's time to exercise a new muscle. Strength belongs to you, Joe, but it's time to start anew, like a babe learnin' to read. They've generations knowin' what to do while we're fresh and new.

Molly picks up a newspaper at the table's edge.

MOLLY

You need someone to teach you all by yourself-a tutor who can guide you to go places you've never gone before.

Molly runs fingers down advertising columns.

MOLLY

A man will never do. I'll find a woman-gentle. She must not scorn the unskilled and unlearned. She must be patient. She must be kind.

Molly’s finger stops on a newspaper ad. She carefully tears it from the paper and folds it into her pocket. 

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/LIBRARY - DAY

Molly waits at the university library table to interview a female teacher/student; Molly is surprised to see Jill Marshone walk toward her. Jill wears a stylish, but slightly outdated dress, looks older and worn.

MOLLY

Jill?

Jill Marshone does not recognize Molly.

JILL MARSHONE

Yes. Do I know you?

Molly blushes and smooths dress.

MOLLY

Yes. I mean, no. Are you the tutor who advertised for hire in the paper?

JILL MARSHONE

Yes. Are you the student?

MOLLY

No. I’m interviewin’ for Joe McGuire.

Jill Marshone looks around.

JILL MARSHONE

Where is he?

MOLLY

‘E couldn’ come today. ‘E’s in classes.

Jill Marshone frowns.

JILL MARSHONE

I need to meet him before I agree to tutor him.

Molly enthusiastically replies.

MOLLY

Oh! Don’ worry at all. ‘E’s smart, true, and kind-a good man. See if it isn't so. 'E'll need to learn how to live a new way. You see, 'e's never been to university before-the first in his family.

Jill Marshone nods head.

JILL MARSHONE 

You can pay?

Molly nods head firmly 'yes'. Jill Marshone looks fretful.

JILL MARSHONE

Well, a week's payment in advance every week and I will study with him three times a week. He may meet me here tomorrow at two o'clock.

Molly breathes out quickly, begins fumbling in her purse for money, and hands wadded money bills to Jill. Jill looks askance at the wadded bills and gingerly accepts them.

MOLLY

Thank you. Thank you, so much. 'E'll do really well, I promise.

Molly backs away, smiles, slightly curtsies, blushes red, shows high excitement at her successful conclusion of the matter. Jill raises her head high and shows a slight disdain for Molly’s obvious lack of poise. The scene closes on Jill laying the wadded bills on the table, smoothing them, and carefully folding them to place neatly into her reticule.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/LIBRARY - DAY

WINTER SNOW DEEP OUTSIDE LIBRARY WINDOW

Joe studies books. Jill Marshone works with him.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/GLASS FACTORY - DAY/NIGHT

Donnegán and Seanán carry hot balls of glass to the blowers. Molly packs completed products in crates for shipping and struggles to carry heavy, filled crates to stack against the wall.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBORHOOD/SHACK - NIGHT

CHRISTMAS WINTER

Melody of "God Bless Ye Merry Gentlemen" plays in the background. A bare, four-foot-tall Chestnut tree stands in a dented can in the room's corner by the window to serve as a Christmas tree. Joe enters the room, waves a grade sheet to his family. Molly pulls it from his hand, looks, gasps, laughs, dances, and passes the semester coursework’s final grades to Donnegán and Seanán. Donnagán and Seanán look, laugh, and clap Joe on the back. Papa Malone smiles contentedly. No presents sit under the tree. A single pot of stew waits on the table. The camera focuses on a single envelope addressed to 'Joe, Tuition and Books' hanging on the tree.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/LIBRARY - DAY

JANUARY WINTER SNOW DEEP OUTSIDE LIBRARY WINDOW

Joe studies books. Jill Marshone works with Joe.

MARCH WIND AND RAIN HEAVY ON OUTSIDE LIBRARY WINDOW

Joe studies books. Jill Marshone works with Joe.

APRIL FLOWERS PROLIFIC OUTSIDE LIBRARY WINDOW

Joe studies books. Jill Marshone works with Joe.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/GLASS FACTORY - DAY

Donnegán and Seanán, serving as 'blower dogs', run hot globs of glass to glass molds and run final product to cooling chamber. Molly loads the finished product into cartons for shipping and struggles to carry heavy, filled crates to stack against the wall for shipping.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/GROUNDS - DAY

SPRING - THREE YEARS LATER

Under an ancient, budding Chestnut tree, Jill Marshone talks with suave, sophisticated, well-dressed, much-changed Joe.

JILL MARSHONE

I have contacts in San Francisco. I'll introduce you to all the right people. You might even become governor of the state. You've got talent, Joe. I can help you realize that talent.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Molly and the boys worked hard to put me here.

JILL MARSHONE

You worked hard to put yourself here. I worked hard to put you here. Look at her. What does she have in common with you anymore? She'll be a drag on your career. You'll never realize your full potential with her. She's like a one-woman, three-ring circus. Such a creature!

Jill stands with high-color in front of Joe. Joe looks down at her thoughtfully.

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBORHOOD/SHACK - NIGHT

Deep into the night, Molly winds her way through dirty back alleys from the glass factory. Molly looks visibly tired, gaunt, but keeps good pace toward home. Molly opens the door to the shack. Joe sits asleep at the table with a letter for a new position by his head. Molly reads the letter. Joe's appearance is radically different from the Joe that began the university three years ago-suave, sophisticated, wears nice clothes, clean. Molly's appearance is disheveled, unkempt, gray-dressed, and aged. Molly holds the letter in her hand with much emotion and a general air of relief-the goal has been reached. Joe awakes and sees Molly with the letter.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

It’s in San Francisco, Molly.

Molly nods, gives a tired smile, but her eyes glow with gladness and the knowing that their surroundings are going to radically change for the better.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated) 

I’m going to accept. It starts right after graduation.

Molly nods happily.

MOLLY

We did it, didn’ we? It wasn’ ‘alf bad, was it? And now we're on our way.

Joe moves uncomfortably and looks around the drab, dirty room.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

I’m not taking you with me, Molly.

MOLLY

‘Course not, Joe. You need time to earn some money so you can send for us. We've been livin' from scrim to scrap for ever so long, there's no extra to take us along. We'll work and save until you're established and then we'll come.

Joe seems confused, hesitates.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Molly...are you sure you’re going to feel comfortable with these people? I mean, well, you haven’t had a university education and you'll need to be able to entertain and socialize with a better class of people-an educated class. University changes people, Molly.

Molly laughs.

MOLLY

Oh, Joe! I studied those bosses’ families and I know lots about entertainin’. I’ll keep you in good style.

Joe looks unconvinced and shrugs.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Sure, Molly.

Donnegán and Seanán enter the one-room shack. Donnagán and Seanán-dressed in filthy work clothes-look exhausted. Molly waves the job offer letter in the air, takes Donnagán and Seanán's hands, swings them around and around, and laughs. Papa Malone smiles from his corner chair.

MOLLY

I told you! I told you, didn’t I? You got to have a dream and before you know it...

Molly laughs exuberantly.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “Keep Lookin’ Where You’re Goin’, Not Where You’re At”)

“Keep lookin' where you're goin', not where you're at/It'll get you through the lean years until you're in the fat/It'll take you from a Monday to a Sunday in nothin' flat/Pass a chilly winter storm into a warm summer breeze jus' as easy as that/Makes cold biscuits without butter scat/Transforms water into sweetest milk, that's a fact/Keep lookin' where you're goin', not where you're at/It'll get you through the lean years until you're in the fat."

MONTH LATER

Joe sits at the kitchen table and shows Molly a ticket to the west coast.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

The firm sent money for my ticket to San Francisco. Are you coming to see me off?

MOLLY

I want to Joe, 'onest I do, but it's a work day and I can' lose a day's pay even if they would let me go.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/GLASS FACTORY/TRAIN STATION/RAILWAY TRACKS - DAY/NIGHT

Molly talks to the glass factory boss; glass factory boss nods 'yes'. Molly grabs her coat, runs to the railway station, and arrives breathless and high colored. Molly's eyes desperately scan the crowd. Molly spies Joe, waves, and calls his name. Joe does not hear. Jill Marshone stands beside Joe, turns face toward Joe, stands on tiptoes and kisses his cheek. Molly stops waving. Confused, Molly makes her way through the crowd.

MOLLY

Joe?

JOE MCGUIRE

Molly.

Molly doesn't look at Jill Marshone.

MOLLY

Joe, you sendin’ for us?

JOE MCGUIRE

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Molly. You have to understand. You just aren't going to fit.

MOLLY

We worked hard, Joe.

Molly levels direct gaze at Joe.

MOLLY

We had the strength to work hard 'cause we had hope. You were our hope. How can we get free with our hope gone?

Joe shifts uncomfortably on his feet, embarrassed in front of Jill Marshone.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Look at you, Molly. Just look at you. Look at your hands and your hair. Listen to the way you talk. University men don't go around with women like you. They go with ladies, Molly. You aren't a lady.

Molly is on the verge of a collapse. Molly looks at Jill Marshone, then looks at Joe.

MOLLY

A ‘lady’ isn’ defined by the tarnish on her hands. A lady is defined by her moral keep. My moral keep is kept. If you can' do it for me, what 'bout your sons, Joe?

JOE MCGUIRE

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

They’ll make it, Molly. I made it. Look at me. I'm one of the bosses' families now. If I can do it, they can.

The train stops and opens doors. The conductor calls for boarding. Molly, stricken, desperately grabs Joe’s arms.

MOLLY

Joe.

JOE MCGUIRE

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

We’ve got to go, Molly. We've got a job waiting.

Joe and Jill Marshone board the train. The train pulls from the station. Molly releases a cry, a second cry, and a third cry. A policeman pushes toward her.

POLICEMAN

Here, here. What’s this fuss? Are you a loony?

Molly blindly turns on the policeman, beats the policeman’s chest as if it is Joe’s chest, and cries out.

MOLLY

Wha’ did I do wrong? We did it. Against impossible odds, we did it! We gave it all we had. We won!

The policeman grabs her wrists firmly. Molly’s face is distorted and ravaged; Molly tears from the policeman's grasp. Wild-eyed, Molly runs down the track after the rapidly disappearing train. Night time shows Molly somewhere in the country, disoriented, walking along the railroad track. Molly falls to her knees on the tracks and raises an agonized wail to the skies. Molly tears at her face, rips her dress at the buttons, and screams to the stars.

MOLLY

What am I to do, Joe? You killed me jus' as certain as knifin' me through the heart. You killed your two sons and you killed my papa. 'Ow can I ever raise us from where we're at with no help? You're a man and needed help to do it. 'Ow can I do it all alone?

Molly’s head falls to her knees. Molly rocks back and forth. Hours later, Molly begins walking back down the railroad track.

MOLLY

I wanted a bit of life, a bit of the sweetness for myself and my boys. Wasn' I worthy enough? How did I become so ugly in three years that you'd not want me anymore?

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/CHESTNUT HILL/CHESTNUT TREE - NIGHT

Molly stands under a flowering Chestnut tree.

FLASHBACK

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/COAL MINE TOWN 1/PASTURE - DAY

JOE MCGUIRE

(Speaks “Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree) V.O.

“Under the spreadin’ Chestnut tree/ When I held you on my knee/We were happy as can be/Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree/Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree/I'll kiss you and you'll kiss me/Oh, how happy we will be/Under the spreadin' Chestnut tree."

FLASH FORWARD

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/CHESTNUT HILL/CHESTNUT TREE - NIGHT

MOLLY

You lef’ me a bag of hardship, Joe. I could drop it off jus' anywhere and go on to an easier life jus' like you did. It's my choice-my life. But, when winter turns, what will I 'ave learned?

Molly pulls Amelia Reed's Bible from her pocket, holds it to heaven, and pounds on its surface.

MOLLY

What ‘appy verse covers this?

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBORHOOD - NIGHT

The Philadelphia clock strikes midnight. Molly arrives in the immigrant neighborhood, sees a woman and a man making physical advances on the alleyway ground, and turns her eyes away in embarrassment. Molly whispers to herself.

MOLLY

Some women make their bed in an alley in the dirt and gravel. Some make their bed in an 'otel in cotton sheets. Some make their bed in a castle in silken blankets. Some make no bed at all. Your tutor, Joe, made her bed and it was a good one. I'll make no bed at all. God help me.

A man comes out of a pub, sees Molly.

MAN

Lookin’ for an easy fifty cents? I can keep you in fifty cents every day if you wan' to come my way.

Molly hides her face in shame, whispers to herself.

MOLLY

Is it so clear so soon that I've been set free with no one's name to carry me?

Molly sets her face firm.

MOLLY

Keep lookin’. I’ve got my sights on bigger money than that.

MAN

Bigger money? Better take a good look at yourself, sister. You ain't worth more than that on any day of the week.

Molly passes a news stand, sees a front page article title-Ten Men Hang for Pennsylvania Coal Mine Conspiracy.

MOLLY

An’ ‘ere your life was saved to do worse than any one of them would ever ‘ave thought to do, Joe.

Molly pulls coin from her purse and purchases the paper. Molly holds the paper in her hands and looks closely at the picture of the men hanging.

MOLLY

Tonight there's 10 women cryin', wonderin' 'ow they'll feed their babies.

Molly sees a heavily pregnant street dog foraging in the garbage, shudders. The street dog holds its paw up to Molly and whines. Molly turns her head away with tears, then turns to walk toward the dog, and gently lays her hand on the dog's head.

MOLLY

You made your bed through no fault of your own. Don' you know there's dogs kept in kennels with finest food every day and then there's you...an' 'ow are you goin' to feed those babies...and who will want 'em when you're through? You'll try so 'ard to give 'em your milk and what will 'appen to 'em for all your tryin'?

The street dog looks at her, wags tail slightly. Molly looks at it sadly.

MOLLY

You’re waggin' at the wrong person. I made a bed worse than you.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBORHOOD/SHACK - NIGHT

Molly stands looking down on sleeping Donnegán, Seanán, and Papa Malone.

MOLLY

An’ who’s to stand between you and the other side of life? God help me, I'll be both husband and wife.

Molly walks to the window and looks at the moon.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “Love”)

“An’ what is love/I’ll give you an 'omely view/Love preserves life, works to make it better/Softens the 'ard and the bitter/Love stands staunchly/Without waiver/Never abandons the weak and ill-favored/Remembers to share its bread with those of poor home/Supports Fathers, Mothers, Sisters, and Brothers/Love is always there/Never looks for a back stair/An' what is love?/Love offers a supportin' hand/Covers fear and hides the storm/An 'omely view, but true."

Molly gathers attitude and addresses the moon.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “Heart”)

“The difference between you and me, Joe is: Molly McGuire's got heart/Molly McGuire's a fighter/Molly McGuire means what she says/With God's help, I'll never leave what I claim as mine/Not as long as I've the breath of life in me to go on/That's somethin', now, I'll tell you/It's somethin' for my boys to 'old on to/Somethin' for my papa to rely on."

Molly retires to her bed, opens her Bible, and looks at the wall.

MOLLY

An’ what am I going to tell 'em so they've got a good name to live up to? If I tell them the truth, I'll take away the one thing left to 'em-a good name. I would cry a river of tears if they lived up to Joe's real name.

MONTH LATER

Molly sits in front of Donnegán, Seanán, and Papa Malone and pretends to read a letter.

MOLLY

‘Is landlady says 'is last words were a wish that 'is two sons go to university and raise themselves in life.

Donnegán and Seanán openly weep. Molly holds them tight.

DONNEGÁN

‘E should ‘ave said good-bye before ‘e left.

Molly nods head yes and wipes Donnegán and Seanán’s eyes.

MOLLY

But, we can make it better by makin' your papa's dream come true. You goin' to university?

Donnegán and Seanán nod heads ‘yes’.

MOLLY

Then, ‘ere’s what we’ll do. Donnagán, Seanán and I will send you to university first. When you're graduated, you 'elp me send Seanán through.

DONNEGÁN

Mum, I been workin’ ‘stead of goin' to school. I won' know the things the other fellas know.

Molly considers.

MOLLY

Then, we’ll use the tutor money we gave Joe and hire ourselves a tutor and we'll all study together so we don' have to pay a second tutor for Seanán.

DONNEGÁN

When? We work all the time now.

MOLLY

Sundays. We don’ work Sundays.

SEANÁN

Sunday’s church day, Mum.

MOLLY

I reckon the Lord will understand if we don’ go for a while. We'll be more suited for His purposes if we're not ignorant.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/LIBRARY - DAY

THREE YEARS LATER

TUTOR 2

I think he's ready, Mrs. McGuire. He's a passing knowledge of mathematics, Latin, Greek, and science.

Molly nods, pays Tutor 2, and reaches a hand to Donnegán.

MOLLY

You’re my son. Work hard as you can for two years. We'll stan' for you now. Remember you must stan' for your brother and me later. Promise me and don't forget.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/LECTURE ROOM - DAY

TWO YEARS LATER

Donnegán-sophisticated, well-dressed, suave-walks across the stage at his graduation ceremony to receive his diploma. Molly sits in the far back, dressed poorly but neatly. Her eyes search for Donnagán's eyes as he walks to his seat. Donnagán flushes as he walks past her, chooses to ignore her as if embarrassed by her simple presence. Molly's hand tightens on the arm of her chair, her face goes white. After the completion of the ceremony, Donnagán makes no attempt to join Molly. Donnagán links arms with a well-dressed, female graduating student, and exits the hall. Molly stands alone at the rear of the room; Molly quietly gathers her purse and exits the hall.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/GROUNDS - DAY

Molly walks quickly across the grounds toward the Chestnut Hill train station.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “I Seen That Look Before”)

“I seen that look b'fore from another/You ain't going to stand for your brother/You're goin' to leave us to fight the battle on 'alf rations and poor keep/A fight that's dear and more than steep/Once I cried, but now I know/B'cause I seen that look b'fore."

Molly doesn’t cry.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/CHESTNUT HILL OVERLOOKING 1900S PHILADELPHIA - NIGHT

Thirty-six-year-old Molly stands under a flowering Chestnut tree looking at a full moon.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “What’s It All About?”)

“What’s it all about?/How can flesh of my flesh walk away?/What kind of a heart can leave us b'hind, stuck in the gray?/I suckled you and gave you life/Did it mean nothin' that you've a Brother and a Mother?/I fertilized your growth with my aging blood/What fruitless vine did it produce?/You've left us a dead coal instead of a fire/A poke in the eye and a deep mire/What's it all about?/What kind of a heart can leave us b'hind, stuck in the gray?"

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBORHOOD/SHACK - NIGHT

Seanán looks up from the table as Molly enters the room.

SEANÁN

‘E’s not coming back, is 'e.

Molly shakes her head no. Seanán lowers his eyes to the table.

MOLLY

Guess ‘e figures 'e's not got anything in common with us anymore.

SEANÁN

‘E promised.

MOLLY

Guess some McGuires don't set much stock in promises.

SEANÁN

I won’t leave you, Mum.

MOLLY

I know.

SEANÁN

How am I going to have a portion?

Molly sets her face firmly.

MOLLY

I’m as strong as a man. I'll work two jobs and find a position for Sundays. We'll jus' cut back a bit. We know all the tricks for cuttin' back.

SEANÁN

(Whispers unsteadily)

Mum, I’m goin' to be a doctor.

MOLLY

Then, you’ll have accomplished more than the two that went before you.

SEANÁN

But, it takes a longer study, Mum.

MOLLY

I guess it isn't how many miles we've got to travel jus' so long's we get there. You been accepted yet?

Seanán pulls a letter from his pocket.

SEANÁN

This last week.

Molly looks at the paper.

MOLLY

Then, God help me, you’re on your way.

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBORHOOD/ SHACK/GLASS FACTORY - NIGHT

The Philadelphia clock chimes as Molly leaves for the glass factory at 0300 hours and arrives home at 2100 hours. Molly never sees the light of day. The shack frequently shows a light shining through the window as Molly leaves and returns. Seanán is shown through the glass window diligently studying large piles of books. Molly's father sits snoozing by the fire to keep Seanán company.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/GROUNDS - DAY

FOUR YEARS LATER

Molly, a skinny, gray woman in a drab dress, sits quietly in the back of the graduation audience. Seanán-gaunt, lean, gray, but sophisticated and earnest-walks across the outdoor stage and takes his diploma. The ceremony ends. Seanán desperately searches the crowd for Molly, sees her, walks to her, gently raises her to her feet, and kisses her.

SEANÁN

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Thank you.

Molly nods. Seanán hesitates. Molly waits.

SEANÁN

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

I received an offer from a hospital in New York. I can start next week.

MOLLY

Then, we better pack and get you ready to go.

SEANÁN

(Educated voice with perfect dictions and words well enunciated)

I want you and Grandpa to come with me.

Molly shakes head 'no'.

MOLLY

It isn’t the way of things. I didn't used to understand, but now I know. What I do best is grow men up fine and set them free, free to fly to their destiny.

SEANÁN

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

I won’t feel right leaving you.

MOLLY

You aren’t leavin' me. You're jus' moving on. I've done all I can for you. There's others who will take my place and they'll help you to grow to an even better man than you already are.

Seanán hesitates. Molly becomes firm.

MOLLY

Go. Meet your future.

Seanán walks away, turns, comes back, hugs Molly, and walks away. Molly's eyes fill with tears.

MOLLY

I once asked what’s life all about. I didn't know then, didn't have an answer. But, now I know. It's about a long battle cry-to never, ever give up and to keep utterin' the warrior's shout.

A bluebird flies over head. Molly notes it and nods her head.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBORHOOD/SHACK - DAY

Molly drapes a cloth around Papa Malone’s neck for a haircut and shave.

MOLLY

I’m thinkin’ life's quite the lady. She seems to favor the poor start...It's almost as if she wants to brag and say, see what I can do with nothin'!

Molly lathers Papa Malone’s face.

MOLLY

We’ve done the right thing by all of them, haven't we? We just had to have the courage to begin, to never say no. Now there's just you and me-so what's it to be?

Molly takes several swipes with the straight edge razor on Papa Malone’s face and then performs a small dance step.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “How Far?”)

“How far can an old man and woman go?/Can they hold hands across time?/Turn back clock's lengthening chime?/Take stock and measure a line?/Is it too late to eat at the Queen's table?/Maintain a fine stable?/After everything's used up, weathered and gray, for what will people pay?/Is there a little cream and honey that still may come an old man's way?/How far can an old man and woman go?/Does a promise ever end?/Is there anything to tend as life flickers at its end?"

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBORHOOD/SHACK - EVENING

Molly sits in bed reading a well-used Bible; she underlines verses, falls asleep reading.

NEXT MORNING

Molly sits at breakfast with Papa Malone and triumphantly reads a Bible verse.

MOLLY

‘Wisdom and knowledge will get you through your times.' There! You see? It suddenly seems so clear. All I have to sell is a strong back. I got to get something inside me that not many people've got, somethin' that commands the higher price.

Molly reaches her hand across to Papa Malone. Papa Malone nods, squeezes Molly's hand. Papa Malone looks out the window. Molly bends to look in the direction Papa Malone is looking. The Chestnut tree on Chestnut Hill is over forty feet tall.

MOLLY

It got big, didn't it?

Papa Malone silently continues to look from the window. Molly makes a suggestion on a whim.

MOLLY

They’ve got a railway built almost right to that tree now. We could ride there if you'd like.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/CHESTNUT HILL/TRAIN STATION - DAY

Papa Malone sits inside a small wagon with a picnic lunch basket. Molly pulls the wagon to the Chestnut tree, spreads a blanket, and looks down on Philadelphia.

MOLLY

(Sudden inspiration)

Someday we’ll build a house here, Papa, and put a brass plate on this tree-one with your name on it. It would make up for so many years of no windows and lookin' at gray buildings...you can see forever from this hill.

After the picnic, Molly pulls the wagon with Papa Malone along the streets and points to the beautiful mansion homes. Day begins to close. In the far distance, the Philadelphia clock begins to chime. The Chestnut Hill train whistles as it pulls into its station.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/IMMIGRANT NEIGHBOORHOOD/SHACK - NIGHT

Molly dishes stew into Papa Malone’s bowl.

MOLLY

I’m thinkin' that I could take in washin', Papa, while I'm studyin'. If we moved closer to the university, I could study at home and work at home. You wouldn't have to be alone so much of the time.

Papa Malone shakes his head 'no' and nods to the kitchen stove.

MOLLY

You think I should cook instead of wash clothes?

Papa Malone nods head yes. Molly teases.

MOLLY

You must think I'm a pretty good cook.

Papa Malone nods and raises bowl for second serving of stew.

PAPA MALONE

(Gutturally and with great effort)

I-R-I-S-H M-A-N-N-A, M-O-L-L-Y.

Molly's eyes open wide; she gasps; tears come to her eyes; she bends to give Papa Malone a hug and a kiss.

MOLLY

Oh, Papa! I told you, everything gets well in its own time. 'How far can an old man and woman go? Does a promise ever end?'

EXT./INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/STREETS/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA ADMISSION OFFICE - DAY

FIRST DAY

Molly finds small, poor flat with a window that looks across university grounds, moves in, chops ingredients for stew, cooks stew, puts the hot, steaming stew pot in the wagon, loads Papa Malone, and pulls the wagon to the university grounds. Papa Malone sits in the wagon with the stew pot and a coin box. Students begin a line to dish stew into cans and place their coins in the coin box. Molly applies for admission to the university. Molly pulls Papa Malone home at noon. The stew pot is empty. Molly counts the money in the coin box.

SECOND DAY

Molly cooks ingredients to fill two stew pots, loads Papa Malone into the wagon, and pulls the wagon to the university grounds. Papa Malone sits in the wagon with the stew pots and the coin box. Students immediately begin a line to dish stew into their cans and to place their coins in the coin box. Molly registers for university classes. Molly pulls Papa Malone home at noon. Both pots of stew are empty. Molly counts the money in the coin box.

THIRD DAY

Molly cooks the ingredients for three stew pots and cooks piles of pretzels, loads Papa Malone into the wagon, and pulls the wagon to the university grounds. Papa Malone sits in the wagon with the stew pots and the coin box. Students immediately begin a line to dish stew into cans. Molly attends her first university class. Molly pulls Papa Malone home in the late afternoon. Three pots of stew are empty. The pretzels are gone. The money can is full. Molly takes envelopes from the cupboard and apportions money into the envelopes and takes the can from the top shelf and prudently places some money into the can.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/CLASSROOM/COUNSELING OFFICES - DAY

Molly struggles with her coursework, becomes so tired that she falls asleep in class {her grades are disappointingly low}, has to retake classes, pays twice for them, cries. The school counselor calls Molly into the counseling office.

COUNSELOR

Mrs. McGuire, your grades are so poor, I believe it would be to your advantage to drop out for a year for private tutoring and then, to resume at a later date.

Molly blushes, lowers head, nods, and quietly leaves the office and talks to herself on the way home.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “Humblin’ Race”)

“It’s not because I’m dumb/In a different place and time/The valedictorian prize could be mine/It's a humblin' situation/But, this race goes to the finisher, doesn't it?/Not just to the strong/Finishin', Molly-O-Girl puts you in a class of its own/Understandin', Molly-O-Girl puts you in a world of renown/Knowin', Molly-O-Girl is the name of the game/There's a certain cycle to it/Might as well follow through with it."

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/FLAT - NIGHT

Molly sits at the table studying university books, stops, and turns to Papa Malone. Molly draws a picture of a small food wagon with a coal stove to keep the food warm.

MOLLY

I had the most wonderful idea. We could sell more lunches with a little cart like this, couldn't we? It would keep the food hot and keep you warm on cold days.

Papa Malone nods his head toward the window where a dog passes. Molly looks.

MOLLY

Yes. A dog could pull it.

Molly draws an umbrella stand on the cart.

MOLLY

An umbrella would keep everything out of the sun and rain.

Papa Malone nods. Molly hugs him. Molly figures with a paper and pencil.

MOLLY

Students need hot food, but they need jobs, too. If we had four or five of these carts, we could give students an opportunity to make income while increasing our income.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/GROUNDS - DAY

Papa Malone sits under a large umbrella beside a gaily painted food cart on wheels. A small coal stove keeps the food hot. A large dog lies beside the cart. A neat sign states 'Papa Malone's Hot Irish Stew'. Lines of students stand waiting for hot stew and pretzels. Molly sits nearby on a bench diligently studying.

INT./EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/CLASSROOM/GROUNDS - DAY

Molly sits in a classroom taking an examination. Molly passes the examination. Molly is euphoric. Molly leaves the classroom and runs to give the news to Papa Malone. Molly is becoming increasingly well-kempt and attractive. Molly wears dresses and fixes her hair in stylish curls. Molly works to overcome her Irish brogue and her poor grammar.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/COUNSELOR'S OFFICE - DAY

Molly sits in front of the counselor.

COUNSELOR

Mrs. McGuire, I would be pleased to pass you from the university except you have not finished any mathematics courses. If you will successfully complete a mathematics course, I think we may be able to graduate you.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/ HALL/CLASSROOM - DAY

Molly walks a university hallway desperately looking for the mathematics classroom, asks a student in the hallway for direction, hurries in the pointed direction, looks up, and sees a professor-tall, rugged, wears an open jacket with little care and high confidence. Molly looks at him wonderingly, lapses into her Irish brogue.

MOLLY (V.O.)

A king! ‘E walks as if the earth belongs to ‘im.

As the professor walks by Molly, he takes a second look as if struck by her. Molly pauses, wonders; then hurries through the classroom door and scoots into the seat in the front row. A teaching assistant takes roll call. Molly raises her hand.

MOLLY

And please, could you add Molly McGuire?

The teaching assistant nods his head 'yes'. Molly visibly relaxes in her seat. The professor walks through the door. Molly tenses, frowns. The Professor sees her in the front row and catches her gaze. Molly blushes. The Professor takes a second look, turns to walk back and forth in front of the lecture lectern, stops, looks at Molly again, begins his lecture with a strong Irish brogue, and begins to lecture just to Molly. Molly becomes flustered. Professor walks to her and lectures to her almost exclusively. Classmates shift in their seats with interest. Molly is much relieved when the class ends. Molly gathers her books and quickly escapes through the classroom door.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/GROUNDS - DAY

Molly walks along the sidewalk, feels befuddled. The professor rolls by her in an expensive carriage with a groom and four horses and tips his hat elegantly. Molly flushes, nods slightly, and turns her head away.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/CLASSROOM - DAY

NEXT DAY

Molly scoots into her front row mathematics class seat of the previous day, changes her mind, and moves to the rear of the room. The professor enters the classroom; his eyes immediately search for Molly; his eyes range through the audience until he sees Molly. The professor beams, begins his lecture, and continues to lecture while pacing back and forth from the room's front seat to Molly's seat.

PROFESSOR

And Molly McGuire, could you tell me how to answer that ancient question?

Molly appears flustered.

MOLLY

No, Sir, I couldn’t.

PROFESSOR

Then, let me propose it another way.

Molly flushes and moves uncomfortably in her seat.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/SIDEWALKS - DAY

After class, Molly exits the room quickly and holds her hand to her diaphragm as if holding down butterflies. She seems glad to escape the increasing tension in the classroom and looks exceptionally relieved as she spies Papa Malone and the food cart. Molly drops her bag of books to the ground and bends to help Papa Malone close the food cart.

NEXT DAY

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/CLASSROOM - DAY

Molly chooses a seat next to the door in the mathematics classroom. The professor enters the classroom; his eyes immediately search for Molly. The professor beams, begins his lecture, and directs much attention to Molly. Molly becomes flustered and leaves the classroom before the class ends.

NEXT DAY

INT./EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/HALLWAY/GROUNDS - DAY

Molly-late to class-begins to enter the mathematics classroom door, stops, and weakly lays her head against the outside wall.

MOLLY (V.O.)

If I go in, I'm done for all time. I'll never be able to say no.

SERIES OF SHOTS

Molly imagines riding in the Professor's fine carriage, going home to a beautiful mansion on Chestnut Hill, wearing beautiful clothes, entertaining socially at a long table with illustrious guests, and taking care of Papa Malone in fine style.

Molly's heart uplifts and expands. Molly sees the professor at the end of the table. The Professor nods his head to her. Molly nods her head to the professor. Molly grows new sons who attend private schools, maintain soft hands. Each son is greatly doted upon by the professor and much loved by Molly. Scenarios flash showing the very opposite life than that which Molly lived with Joe McGuire and with her first two sons.

END SERIES OF SHOTS

Molly places her hands on her flushed cheeks and walks rapidly away from the classroom.

MOLLY

(Increasingly educated voice with better diction and words well enunciated)

Oh, Molly, what have you done? You vowed to keep your bed. Is your word so little, your promises so poorly kept?

Molly stops on the stairs, hesitates.

MOLLY

(Increasingly educated voice with better diction and words well enunciated)

How can I not run to him? A life could be mine, a life fine. A life not just for me, but for Papa. Papa would ride in a carriage tall and live in a king's hall. I'm still young. I can bear new sons.

Molly makes herself descend the stairs to the outside sidewalk and begins running to Papa Malone’s food cart. Papa Malone quietly observes her high color.

MOLLY

Oh, Papa. Hold me.

Molly breaks from his grasp. Molly's cheeks are highly colored.

MOLLY

Papa, wouldn't it be wonderful to live in a castle? Ride in a coach grand?

Papa Malone’s eyes light up. Papa Malone hands Molly the coin box and urges her to open it. Molly counts the cash and gasps.

MOLLY

Papa! From one day’s work? It's more than I earned in a week at the glass factory!

Papa Malone nods. Molly hears a coach approaching. Molly looks up. The professor rides in the fancy coach. He tips his hat gravely to Molly. Molly's heart goes with the coach; her face yearns for the life it represents. Molly looks down at Papa Malone; Molly's face twists. Molly looks at the cash in the box which now seems so little. Her eyes return to the vanishing carriage and then she looks back at the cash box.

MOLLY (V.O.)

But, this is mine. This is what I've earned. You have to earn your place in life. He has a fortune which you have had no part in earning. It is better to be free with a fortune of my own-one that properly belongs to Papa and me.

Molly looks at the cash box.

MOLLY (V.O.)

A king and a housemaid-that's what it would be. Wouldn't a proper king desire a proper queen? You're no queen, Molly McGuire.

Papa Malone closes the cart stand. Molly observes his tired face, stooped shoulders, and takes pity.

MOLLY (V.O.)

And, I’m not Joe. Papa Malone grew me straight and true. We'll own what we earn. Aren't desires easily trimmed?

Molly reaches down and begins harnessing the dog to the cart. Molly and Papa Malone head home.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/REGISTRAR ROOM - DAY

NEXT DAY

Molly sits at the counselor’s desk and fills paperwork to drop the mathematics class.

COUNSELOR

Molly, I cannot graduate you this semester if you drop this class.

MOLLY

I know. I will just have to graduate the next semester.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/EDUCATION BUILDING - DAY

THREE DAYS LATER

The professor comes around the side of the education building as Molly walks around the same building. The professor stops and tips his hat.

PROFESSOR

(Gravely)

You didn’t attend my class this week.

Molly tips her head proudly.

MOLLY

No. I dropped the class.

PROFESSOR

Why, Molly McGuire?

MOLLY

It was beyond my ability to complete.

The professor searches her eyes.

PROFESSOR

Is that the only reason, Molly McGuire?

MOLLY

What other reason could there be?

The professor holds hands out as if beseeching Molly.

PROFESSOR

Molly.

Molly steels herself, lowers her eyes, shakes her head firmly 'no'.

MOLLY

Put all that energy into writing a new mathematics book. You'll become famous. See if it isn't so.

Molly turns and walks rapidly away. 

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/CHESTNUT HILL/CHESTNUT TREE - DAY

Molly stands by the Chestnut tree. A wind slightly ruffles her lovely dress and sash. Molly’s facial color is high. She seems completely alive, almost at one with the lovely surroundings.

MOLLY

I can feel him through the air, along a midnight breeze, know his thoughts, his fears, his wants. He thrills my every limb. God help me. I've a pain worse than death to turn away from this.

A bird sings within the tree. Molly looks up.

MOLLY

If you could talk, what would you tell me?

Molly smiles ruefully.

MOLLY

I already know, don’t I. Keep your hands free. Hunt your own meat. It will be twice sweet.

Molly lifts her head to sing. Scenes flash to illustrate the words of the song.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “Fulfill Your Destiny”)

“Life can be a stone/Others use to skip/Across a smallish pond/A momentary pleasure/Quite forgotten as it disappears from sight/Life can be a rock/Others use to grind/Many ears of corn/Useful for a time/Casually tossed aside with similarly broken stones/Whatever happened to 'Fulfill your destiny?'/Taking life out of others' hands/Handling it from every side/Ascertaining its purpose/Setting it to fire/Striking it/Making it strong and firm/Forging it into a chosen, useful purpose/Not afraid to let it burn/Whatever happened to 'Fulfill your destiny?'/Taking life out of others' hands/Handling it from every side/Ascertaining its purpose/Setting it to fire/Striking it/Making it strong and firm/Not afraid to let it burn."

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/CLASSROOM - DAY

Scenes show Molly struggling along through coursework with a different mathematics instructor. She stands at the blackboard writing equations. He shakes his head and crosses through part of her figuring. She erases the work and begins afresh. Finally, he looks critically, smiles, and shakes her hand. Molly responds with a glad cry, kisses him on both cheeks, and runs from the room.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/GRADUATION ROOM - DAY

Molly graduates and walks across the stage to take her diploma.

Papa Malone begins clapping as Molly walks down the aisle to Papa Malone's seat at the rear of the room. Students turn around to see who is clapping and realize it is Papa Malone clapping. A whisper, 'Papa Malone', goes through audience. Students stand to join Papa Malone's clapping and give a standing ovation for Molly. Molly looks from one side to the other of the auditorium with great astonishment.

INT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/MOLLY'S UNIVERSITY HOUSE - DAY

Molly shows a letter to Papa Malone.

MOLLY

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

I’ve been offered a position.

Papa Malone shakes his head ‘no’, points through the clean window to the university, and shows Molly the cash can from the lunch cart.

MOLLY

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Oh, Papa, how can I sell lunches when I’ve been prepared to help others in a much different capacity?

Papa Malone shakes his head firmly 'no', points to self and then to the can, points to Molly and then to the university.

MOLLY

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

You want me to continue attending university?

Papa Malone shakes his head 'yes' and raises his hand high into the air.

MOLLY

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

You think I should get a better degree?

Papa Malone nods his head 'yes'. Molly looks out the window contemplatively.

MOLLY

(Educated voice with perfect diction and words well enunciated)

Master of my craft? A Doctor of my philosophy?

Papa Malone shakes his head 'yes'. Molly looks wonderingly at Papa Malone.

MOLLY

(Educated voice with perfect dictions and words well enunciated)

Such a thought never crossed my mind, Papa. Dr. Molly McGuire. That's such a funny thing to think about. Is that what you truly want?

Papa Malone shakes his head 'yes'.

INT./EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA/MOLLY’S UNIVERSITY HOUSE/GROUNDS/CLASSROOMS/CONCERT HOUSE/STREETS - DAY/NIGHT

Scenes show Molly continuing to take courses and teaching at the university. Papa Malone examines an advertisement for new artificial legs, tries them, purchases them, and begins walking to campus. Papa Malone builds more food carts. Papa Malone and Molly become increasingly sophisticated and well-dressed. Papa Malone attends a university concert with Molly. After the concert, Papa Malone helps Molly into a carriage. Molly looks up and sees the professor helping an exceptionally sophisticated and beautiful woman into his carriage. The professor does not notice Molly. Molly looks down as if to hide her face, pats the velvet cushion on which she sits, presses her lips firmly together, and raises her face proudly. Papa Malone gives a slip of paper to their carriage driver. The carriage driver turns his rig toward downtown Philadelphia. Molly turns to Papa Malone with a question in her eyes. Papa Malone pats her arm and smiles.

MOLLY

A surprise.

Papa Malone nods his head 'yes'.

INT./EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/NEW FACTORY - DAY/NIGHT

Soon the carriage stops in front of a factory. A sign states 'Papa Malone's Stew and Pretzel Factory'. Molly turns surprised eyes to Papa Malone. Papa Malone steps from the carriage and holds his hand for Molly. Molly steps down and enters the new factory. A middle-aged Joe McGuire, wealthy and used to command, stands in the middle of the room.

JOE MCGUIRE

Hello, Molly.

Molly doesn't speak. Molly's hand goes to her heart. Molly turns betrayed eyes to Papa Malone.

MOLLY

Why, Papa?

Joe takes control of the conversation.

JOE MCGUIRE

He thought it was time you realized the fruits of your labor. A worker deserves their wages, don't they, Molly?

Molly’s hurt eyes look directly into Joe’s eyes. Joe looks back honestly and speaks from the heart.

JOE MCGUIRE

Molly, sometimes when you turn a man inside out...fashion him into something new...he loses his bearings for awhile. A man can make mistakes in his life, but God help him if he doesn't try to make them right.

From the shadows of the room, Donnegán moves forward with a wife and four children. Then, Seanán moves forward with a wife and three children. Molly’s face cracks with emotion; her eyes flood with tears and she lapses into the old Irish brogue.

MOLLY

And who be these little ones?

DONNAGÁN

The next generation of McGuires, Mother.

Donnegán and Seanán urge their children forward toward Molly.

SMALLEST GIRL

My daddy and grandfather say that all McGuires go to university and I have to go when I grow up. Did you go to university?

Molly’s eyes fill with tears; Molly nods her head 'yes' and quickly kneels to the ground to envelop all the children in her arms.

MOLLY

Why, you’re beautiful. Just beautiful.

Molly holds the children at arm's length and carefully examines their hands.

MOLLY

And, you have such beautifully soft hands.

Donnegán and Seanán move forward.

DONNAGÁN

Mother, I want you to meet my wife.

Molly stands, nods her head graciously, and reaches to hug the young woman.

SEANÁN

And mine, Mother.

Molly nods her head graciously, reaches to hug the young woman, and then wipes a tear away.

MOLLY

Please excuse my tears. We worked so hard for so long, you see...and now...here's the reality I never hoped to see.

Molly endeavors to gain composure by changing the subject. Molly looks around the factory.

MOLLY

And, what is all this in this big room?

JOE MCGUIRE

It’s time the family took the next step, Molly.

Molly flushes, her eyes flash, and she raises her chin. Joe McGuire notes the action and remembers her feisty spirit with longing and sadness of face.

MOLLY

And that is?

Joe McGuire moves aside. Molly sees sixteen new food carts parked along the wall. Twenty students stir pots of stew over stoves. Papa Malone walks to a corner of the room where cans wait for packing into boxes. He uses a can opener to open a can, takes a spoon, and gives Molly a taste. Papa Malone turns the can's label to show a likeness of Molly and the words 'Philadelphia's Best'. Molly's eyes again fill with tears.

MOLLY

Oh, Papa.

Papa Malone smiles and points toward the ceiling. A large banner proclaims, 'Under the Chestnut Tree.'

MOLLY

All the years with no Christmas presents and here we are in this room tonight with all of those years returned in one big package. Life-didn't it play its own game, now-like an Irish leprechaun, mischievous, fooling with the heart and mind to make a body believe the pot of gold could never be found.

Papa Malone nods and motions Molly to follow him through the exterior door. Molly turns and motions to Donnegán and Seanán to follow. Donnegán and Seanán shake their heads 'no'.

DONNAGÁN

We’re going to put the children to bed, Mother, and we'll meet you tomorrow for breakfast.

Papa Malone, Molly, and Joe walk outside and enter the carriage. Papa Malone smiles, squeezes Molly's hand tightly, and hands a slip of paper to the carriage driver. Molly looks at Papa Malone's high color and guesses the reason.

MOLLY

Another surprise?

Papa Malone smiles again and puts a gloved finger to his lips.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/CHESTNUT HILL/CHESTNUT TREE - NIGHT

Molly, Papa Malone, and Joe McGuire disembark from the carriage and walk to the Chestnut tree on Chestnut Hill. Moonlight shows a huge mansion standing behind the Chestnut tree. Molly looks at Papa Malone questioningly. Papa Malone pulls a paper from his pocket and leads her to the carriage lantern so that Molly can read the paper.

MOLLY

We own it? A real home...of our own.

Papa Malone smiles and nods ‘yes’.

EXT. PENNSYLVANIA/PHILADELPHIA/CHESTNUT HILL/MOLLY'S MANSION/CHESTNUT TREE - DAY

Molly sits taking morning brunch with Donnegán, Seanán, and their wives at the side of the beautiful mansion by the Chestnut Hill Chestnut tree. One hundred burlap-balled Chestnut trees sit sedately at the side lawn waiting for planting. The seven beautifully dressed grandchildren play croquet on the manicured lawn. The smallest girl, a granddaughter, runs to Molly's side.

SMALLEST GIRL

Grandmother! They’ve hit my ball where I cannot find it!

Donnegán begins to correct the smallest girl, his daughter.

DONNAGÁN

Marie, it’s not polite to....

Molly shakes her head at Donnegán and bends to the smallest girl’s eye level, pretends mock horror at such an offense, stands, and reaches for the granddaughter's hand.

MOLLY

Then, we’ll look for it together! Which way did it go?

The smallest girl points toward the Chestnut tree. Molly and the smallest girl walk toward the tree together and walk around its large trunk. Molly looks down and finds the ball in the flower bed that partially surrounds the base of the Chestnut tree. Molly hands the ball to the smallest girl and watches as the smallest girl runs quickly across the lawn to rejoin the game. Molly watches as Joe McGuire walks out of the mansion's French doors to join the family for brunch and smiles as the maid helps Papa Malone seat himself at the table. Molly sees a brass plate on the Chestnut tree and traces the engraved words on the Chestnut tree's brass plate with her fingers: ‘Castanea dentata; American Chestnut; Love, Justice, Loyalty, Honesty; Papa Malone’. Molly turns toward the growing city of Philadelphia. From behind her the air fills with sounds of happy grandchildren's laughter and her sons' and their wives’ low tones of peaceful chatter. Molly's face grows exceptionally peaceful.

MOLLY

(Speak/sings “Life”)

“Sometimes life’s like a wildfire licking at the heels/Making a fella race and hop/Forcing persons into the tightest of spots/When the flames a'burning and scorching flesh and heart/Better jump to find the best you've got/If you keep climbin' every wall, there'll come a time when you can stand tall."

A maid walks across the lawn and calls to Molly.

MAID

Ms. McGuire, Mr. McGuire and Mr. Malone want you to sign some papers before the lawyer leaves. And, the Women's Society sent a messenger to ask about your plans for the Chestnut trees.

MOLLY

Thank you, Maisy. Tell Mr. McGuire and Mr. Malone that I'll be right in. Tell the Women's Society that we are going to cover this hill with those Chestnut trees.

Molly turns to look once more over the city of Philadelphia. Scenes flash in her mind of Joe with the groceries telling her he is going to court her; Joe singing 'Under the Chestnut Tree'; Joe leaving on the train with Jill Marshone; Donnegán walking out with the female student; Seanán looking back at her; the professor holding out pleading hands; Papap Malone sitting in the rain, sleet, and snow selling stew and pretzels; and the audience clapping at her graduation. Molly smiles slightly.

MOLLY

(Continues to speak/sing “Life”)

“And/Life plays among us/Such a light and frivolous thing/Sometimes hovering like a butterfly before taking wing/We chase it-so captivated by its shimmering/That we barely notice brushing against the stinging nettles and the instant pain they bring/We diligently pursue it over mountain, slew, and slough/Eagerly tracking it through each new spring/Life-as the years cycle 'round-unobtrusively leads us to its final phase/High above the ground."

The camera cameos Molly McGuire’s face.

MOLLY

(Softly in old Irish brogue)

Life belongs to the Molly McGuires. See if it isn’t so.

Camera fades into the flowering Chestnut tree.

THE END 

FADE OUT.

Music from "Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree" begins to play in the background as the fronds of the Chestnut tree unfold and blossom into spring while credits begin rolling across the screen.

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